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NATIONAL CLERIHEW DAY – July 10

National Clerihew Day - July 10

National Clerihew Day – July 10

NATIONAL CLERIHEW DAY

July 10 of each year celebrates National Clerihew Day in the United States.  Invented by Edmund Clerihew Bently, a clerihew is a whimsical, four-line biographical poem.

In the year 1905, Bently wrote one of his best known which is:

      Sir Christopher Wren
Said, “I am going to dine with some men
If anyone calls
Say I am designing St. Paul’s.


“A clerihew has the following properties:

  • It is biographical and usually whimsical, showing the subject from an unusual point of view; it pokes fun at mostly famous people
  • It has four lines of irregular length and metre (for comic effect)
  • The rhyme structure is AABB; the subject matter and wording are often humorously contrived in order to achieve a rhyme, including the use of phrases in Latin, French and other non-English languages
  • The first line contains, and may consist solely of, the subject’s name.”
     (Wikipedia)

English novelist and humorist, Edmund Clerihew Bently (July 10, 1875 – March 30, 1956), was a 16-year-old student when he thought up the lines for his first ever clerihew.

Sir Humphry Davy
Abominated gravy.
He lived in the odium
Of having discovered sodium.

CELEBRATE

On National Clerihew Day, try writing a clerihew or two of your own! Post on social media using #NationalClerihewDay to encourage others to join in paying it forward.

HISTORY

Within our research, we were unable to find the creator and origin of National Clerihew Day, an “unofficial” national holiday.

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3 Responses to “NATIONAL CLERIHEW DAY – July 10”

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. July 10th – National Clerihew Day | One Day At A Time - July 10, 2015

    […] Read about the rules of a clerihew on NationalDayCalendar.com. […]

  2. Thirsty? | Hank Bashjian.com - July 10, 2015

    […] National Clerihew Day […]

  3. July 9th – National Sugar Cookie Day | One Day At A Time - July 9, 2015

    […] National Clerihew Day […]

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